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Heat straightening Wellington Bridge

Heat straightening Wellington Bridge

Wellington Bridge Repairs, Highways Agency, Area 6 Heat Straightening Regions of both plastic and elastic deformation are likely to co-exist in the steelwork of bridges that suffer severe vehicle strikes, and particularly so in the case of bridges with concrete composite decks. A fundamental principle of heat-straightening is that heat should only be applied to [...]

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The effect of Heating Temperature in Steel Bridge Repairs

The effect of Heating Temperature in Steel Bridge Repairs

650oC is the maximum heating temperature specified in most international fabrication standards for the steel grades typically used in bridge construction. It is also the temperature recommended by Federal Highways in their technical guide for heat straightening damaged steel bridges.   It’s an operating temperature that gives a good balance between effectiveness and caution. Nothing [...]

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Heat-straightening technology (3 of 3)

Consider a piece of metal bar tightly fitted in a very stiff clamp as shown in Figure 1. If intense heat is applied to a small area of the bar as shown, the heated volume of metal will tend to expand, but the clamp restrains longitudinal expansion. Compressive stress then builds up in the bar [...]

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Heat-straightening Technology (2 of 3)

New Road Overbridge, crossing the M5 near Weston-super-Mare, was struck by a northbound truck carrying a shipping container in early 1999. The outer main girder, an 838 x 292 x 226 universal beam spanning 18m with composite concrete deck, sustained severe damage. There were no bracings connecting the outer girder to inner girders, and consequently [...]

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Heat-straightening technology (1 of 3)

Heat Straightening Technology

My first experience of the heat-straightening process in steel bridgework was in 1971. I was working with a very experienced plater setting up the joint between a pair of large box girders. As the junior site engineer my job was to align the boxes correctly with theodolite and level. The plater and his helper would [...]

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